Websites You Should Know and Use for Social Marketing

Websites You Should Know and Use for Social Marketing Ideas

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING AUDIO + VISUAL IDEAS 

This list was derived from the following TED blog ….

100 Websites You Should Know and Use

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The Ins and Outs of Cloud and Outsourcing

The speed at which IT is developing and the general nature of modern business means that many enterprises rely on specialists to manage our systems and applications. Economic and competitive pressures have made it imperative for organisations of all sizes to focus on their core competencies and turn to third-parties to assume responsibility for key corporate functions. The most common form of outsourcing is the cloud. The cloud simplifies many aspects of IT and the business services world.

Outsourcing is by no means a new or revolutionary concept and to date, it continues to deliver consistent financial benefits. By engaging a cloud service, a small organisation can have access to leading technology without large investments, while global enterprises can ensure that business sectors are managed effectively and efficiently.

Aside from obvious financial benefits, the list of incentives continues to grow: service quality, access to innovation, the removal of non-core functions, access to leading IT skills and resources, and forecast future IT spending all contribute.

For any enterprise, the benefits of outsourcing to the cloud are only guaranteed if certain guidelines and precautions are put in place, and in order to do this, you must understand the challenges:
• Potential loss of control over certain business functions
• Rigidity and a general lack of flexibility in the services received
• Time and effort involved in managing the service provider

The key is to select a provider whose cloud portfolio is as flexible and varied as the workloads it may handle—today and into the future. For many enterprises, the cloud is no longer a curiosity, but an opportunity to transform IT. As they think beyond one or two isolated workloads, their criteria in selecting a cloud provider become more stringent. To meet business goals for efficiency, cost-reduction, and simplification of processes, enterprises must look for a cloud provider that offers a range of services that meet today’s needs and can grow with the business.

Understanding the organisation you are outsourcing to is pivotal in addressing potential security problems, so below are some basic guidelines:

Understand the current security model

It sounds obvious, but often it is taken for granted. Evaluating the security controls currently in place in your organisation and what risks they should be eliminating, is important in knowing what you need to ask for when you seek a cloud service. This process also helps identify what is working and what isn’t, and provides you with the ability to request the same security standards in your cloud service provider (CSP). If this assessment uncovers gaping holes, you have the opportunity to rectify this with your new CSP, or if your security is up to scratch, then you have a benchmark by which to measure. Ensuring that internal security measures and your new CSP security credentials matchup is critical in delivering the safest environment possible for your organisation.

The variety of cloud solutions available – from infrastructure through to network – your cloud choice may need to integrate with existing security standards. In such cases, firewalls and other traditional security measures can be adapted to integrate with new security policies. In theory, this is the case; however a full assessment and understanding of these traditional measures may uncover non-compatibility with current systems. Understanding the full scope of your business, your requirements and your current security measures will direct you to what you need from your CSP.

Keep in mind: Change can be difficult, and risky. Have a safety net in place. Your security systems are going to change in your organisation, and to make sure it is for the better means you need to understand the security bottom line.

Don’t be afraid to: Take this security investigation as an opportunity to give your security system an overhaul.

 Ask tough questions and assess the risks

Managing your outsourcers’ security levels should not be overlooked. The CSP’s internal security policies, regulations and laws (if you are looking offshore) need to be understood and evaluated. They will help develop a picture of what the security spectrum of your business will look like in an outsourced environment and most importantly identify any current gaps.

A cloud has different avenues for attack than would otherwise be available in a traditional data centre. The increased surface of a cloud increases its vulnerabilities which puts your organisation at higher risk. Things such as virtual switches, the item connecting virtual machines with virtual networks by directing communication and data packets, and software programs that allow machines to communicate with each other, are characteristics that previously your organisation may not have been exposed to, so it is critical to understand the potential impact of this new environment.

Transferring part or all of your organisations IT footprint to the cloud is a big change with sometimes unpreventable mishaps. If a problem arises based on an unexpected incident, who is to blame? The organisation or the provider? Allocating the right responsibility needs to be determined in the initial phase to avoid any confusions in the long run. Responsibility here is in relation to your organisation and the outsourcer. Be upfront when embarking on this new relationship and opening the doors between your current IT staff and your future provider to ensure that expectations and responsibilities are measured and tracked.

Keep in mind: What you expect your outsourcer to deliver may not always be clear. Define and determine responsibilities. Ensure that your CSP offers the levels of customer service you are accustomed to, with access to expert technicians (either on-staff or through a certified partner network). For additional levels of support, find a provider that offers a range of managed and professional services to help you develop a cloud strategy, migrate to the cloud, and maintain optimal cloud performance.

Don’t be afraid to: Look up specific international security standards and be informed and aggressive when dealing with your future (or current) CSP.

 Investigate the environment

Knowing what needs to be outsourced is very different from knowing what the ripple effect will be when that segment of your organisation is actually outsourced and placed on the cloud.

Your cloud provider is now the first line of defence in your external incident management process. They must be able to detect, evaluate and report any incident in a suitable timeframe and in the process already expected by your company. Consider, too, the legal and operational impacts. By outsourcing, you are in a way, joining with another organisation, so be sure of the overall compatibility.

Consider this, too: Multi tenancy. You could be one of numerous companies that the CSP is providing service to. There is no physical separation. Investigate whether you are entering into a multi-tenant environment, and what exactly this means for your organisation and its information.

The outsourcer will be retaining a lot of information about your internal organisation workings, too. If any internal incidents occur, accessibility around records must be agreed upon and understood. Identifying individuals within the outsourcing organisation will help increase transparency and reaction around any issues.

Keep in mind: Your information is now housed inside other organisations (metaphorical) walls. This is an integrated service, designed to know the ins and outs of your organisation. Don’t be afraid to: Look for evidence that shows whether each service provider has experienced serving enterprises like yours. These include sample customer lists, reputation, track record, and existing customer base. Service providers with experience in your company’s industry or have similar customers are likely to understand your business and technology needs.

Original Publication

What is a Twitter Account worth? What is your Social Reputation worth?

My Twitter account is valued at…..  $928.49    by http://www.twalue.com/

How is your Twalue calculated?

  • The number of followers you have is the base number.
  • The more people you follow, the lower your Twalue will be.
  • Lists contribute a small amount to your Twalue.
  • The faster you’ve gained your followers, the higher your Twalue will be.

An interesting article about this trend in trying to put a value on your social network can be found here ….

Social-media  /black markets for Twitter accounts put a price on your reputation

P.S. My twitter Account is NOT FOR SALE.

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SOCIAL + BUSINESS + E-COMMERCE – Websites You Should Know

SOCIAL + BUSINESS + E-COMMERCE Websites You Should Know

This list was derived from the following TED blog ….

100 Websites You Should Know and Use

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How to Use Social Media to Find Customers

How social-media marketing helps generate business leads?

One report below cites that:

– 77 percent of business-to consumer (B2C) marketers have acquired customers through Facebook,

– business-to-business (B2B) marketers have found more success on LinkedIn — finding it 277% more effective than Facebook or Twitter.

Read more:

How to Use Social Media to Find Customers (Infographic)

 
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The Five Traits of the thriving IT Organization

To thrive in this new competitive environment, IT and business leaders must actively develop five new organizational traits:

• A Learning Organization
• A Disciplined Organization
• A Transparent Organization
• An Intimate Organization
• A Dynamic Organization

Read more …….

The Five Traits of the Quantum IT Organization

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Managing trouble if your Cloud is in a Storm

Cloud computing comes with many key decision and considerations. There are decisions to be made around whom to choose, what to look for and what specific service it is that you ultimately need for your organisation.

When an organisation starts to think about moving to the cloud, the driving force is usually twofold: achieving a competitive edge in business and the cost saving benefits the cloud promises. While these are the incentives, the considerations when choosing a cloud service provider (CSP) need to be a lot more detailed. You are migrating your business from one form of technology to a newer and still developing one, and hence must consider scalability, control and security.

This can be a long, slow and painful process. CSPs are, ultimately, still subject the same cyber problems as your company was back when the humble server was the apple of the CIO’s eye. You may have decided on a CSP boasting near 100 per cent up time. But what about errors in the file system, misconfigurations, abuse attempts, programming errors and bugs? When they hit, service outages happen. Maybe not every time, but they can happen.

The Australian Government Department of Defence, Intelligence and Security have an online resource dedicated to advice for “Cloud Computing Security Considerations”. Aimed to assess the benefits and risk associated to cloud, the site also investigates the potential disasters associated when cloud provider drop outs occur.

The question the site raises is this: what happens if your data is housed in the cloud and your cloud service provider, for some unknown reason, becomes unavailable?

And this is one of the true problems of cloud computing. By placing your organisation’s data, information and trust in a service provider, you ultimately lose the ability to directly and independently fix problems if and when they occur. There is a whole world of security threats floating around that have the potential to wreak havoc with a business’ critical data and applications, and that can damage an organisation’s reputation and bottom line.

And, even more concerning, what happens if your trusted CSP unexpectedly goes out of business. Where does your data go? Who has rights to it? How do you recover it? Is it still secure? The plethora of questions that this potential situation brings up is enough to warrant serious concern, consideration and preparation.

So, below are five tips which you need to consider if and when, and ideally before, you migrate to the cloud to ensure that business can go on as usual if your provider becomes unavailable.

1. Demand connectivity and availability

The Cloud Computing Security Considerations highlights availability, bandwidth, latency and packet loss as the four key concerns when looking at network capacity from vendor to organisation. If there is inadequate connectivity, then ultimately your organisation will reduce its capacity to function as it should when working on the cloud. Similarly, you need to understand the provider’s availability. Availability can be affected by a host of things: targeted attacks, unsuccessful an ineffective maintenance, hardware problems and so the list goes on. As always, doing due diligence on your cloud service provider is critical. You need to ensure that the provider will meet your organisation’s cost, quality-of-service, regulatory compliance and risk management requirements.

The system housing your organisations information and identity must have capacity and ability to deliver a connected and available service, otherwise the CSP is redundant.

Ask yourself: is there any room to compromise on connectivity and availability when looking at my service provider?

Understand the service level agreement (SLA) so there is no confusion around the level and quality of service you are signing up for.

2. Be realistic – the threats are largely the same

Physical systems in offices can crash and fail – losing your data on site and in your office. Whether you have just migrated to the cloud, or have been a long-time resident, the risks you now face are the same as those you faced with a server purring in the back room. The loss of important data is another concern that businesses ignore at their own peril. A hacker or a disgruntled employee could delete important data. However, hackers and employees are not the only ones who might be responsible for such a circumstance. Important, mission critical data can be lost due to the negligence of a cloud service provider.

So what was your plan then? Assess the guidelines you had in place before migration, and then adapt these to the new technology.

Ask yourself: What are the bottom line security standards our organisation needs? Understand your key areas of weakness so you can develop a plan to protect them.

3. Back up. Again. And again.

Moving data to the cloud means it is no longer housed underneath your organisations roof. It is housed in a data centre somewhere across the globe. To future proof your data and ensure that you are not left in the lurch without important information and applications; your best option is to work with two cloud suppliers and house your data in both. This means that when one provider goes down its extremely unlikely the other will.

Either way, the cost is generally a good investment for peace of mind.

Ask yourself: is it worthwhile spending additional money on a second back up to ensure that business can run as usual if one CSP goes down?

4. Your SLA: The scheduled, the unexpected and the unsaid

Any service level agreement (SLA) will have listed the maximum possible unscheduled downtime that can occur without breaching it. The Cloud Computing Security Considerations notes that “typical SLAs that guarantee 99.9% availability can have up to nine hours of unscheduled outages every year without breaching the SLA”. 9 hours may sounds small in the scheme of things, but timing and deadlines could potentially render an ‘unscheduled outage’ catastrophic.

Likewise, your SLA should have an estimate on scheduled downtime, for key activities like maintenance. Understand what notice your contact says you will be given and what the parameters are here.

Another key consideration when it comes to SLA is compensation. Downtime can have huge effects on your businesses functionality and depending on severity could tarnish reputation.

By understanding your SLA you are more capable to assess the potential impact an outage could have, what you should expect in relation to downtime and if your organisation could manage this in day to day workings.

Ask yourself: how much time out can your business take without your business suffering. Is it an inconvenience or a hindrance?

There are huge discrepancies across SLAs for CSPs. Understand your SLA, and be aware that it is likely skewed in the providers favour. Knowledge is power.

5. Good relationships are founded on trust

You are putting sensitive data and critical applications in the hands of your provider. You need to have trust that if they can manage this data, they can manage to get you back on board in a reasonable time frame and without real stresses to your business.

Your provider needs to be reliable and secure, and ultimately be able to protect your data even when there is down time.

There should be minimal doubt when you sign that dotted line.

Ask yourself: what do you know about this provider, their history and their capacity. Understand your demands and their solutions. Do your research, and if you find any red flags, don’t hesitate to ask.

Original publication on CSO.